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Another Excellent Week

Friday 25th January | Comments are off for this post
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What a great week that was in 6S: the children have worked hard and should be very proud of how well they completed their second set of practice SATs.

Homework:

Using the CGP books, please read pages 46 and 47 of the red maths book (percentages) and page 24 of the purple literacy book (prepositions). Once the children have read these pages, they should complete pages 38 and 39 in their white maths workbook and page 32 in their white literacy workbook. Children will begin work on percentages next week in maths whilst there were some common misunderstandings around prepositions in this week’s grammar practice SAT.

Aside from practice SATs, children have had a brief introduction to percentages: children were taught about percentages representing parts of 100 and that 100% is equal to the whole, the total or, in some cases, simply one. Children have also revised adding and subtracting decimal numbers. It is important that children line up the numbers correctly in their place value columns when writing out decimal calculations. With practice, children shall become much more confident at this.

In literacy, children have begun reading an adapted version of Dickens’ Oliver Twist. Using point and evidence, children have answered retrieval and inference questions from chapters 1 and 3. Using evidence from the text to support longer answers is an expectation of Year 6 and I am pleased to report that lots of children are already confident in doing this.

Children also enjoyed sharing the timelines they created as homework.  There are lots of fascinating lives within the families and friends of 6S! Thank you to all family members who have support the children in completing this task.

In PSHE, children have continued their work around migration by looking at human rights. Next week, the children will look at a number of stories of how different children live around the world and consider if their human rights are being neglected.

 

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